The Latest

laughingsquid:

Designers Create Fashionable Super Bowl XLVIII Football Helmets for NFL Charity Auction
Jan 27, 2014 / 964 notes
laughingsquid:

Photos of Everyday Objects That Look Like Simple Drawings
Jan 27, 2014 / 213 notes
laughingsquid:

German Artist Custom Hand Paints Ants Crawling on Vintage Porcelain Dishes
Jan 14, 2014 / 476 notes
And here is a good dose of reality.
kateoplis:

“Let me state the obvious: I have never lived on the brink. I’ve never been in foreclosure, never applied for food stamps, never had to choose between feeding my children or paying the rent, and never feared I’d lose my paycheck when I had to take time off to care for a sick child or parent. I’m not thrown into crisis mode if I have to pay a parking ticket, or if the rent goes up. If my car breaks down, my life doesn’t descend into chaos.
But the fact is, one in three people in the U.S. do live with this kind of stress, struggle, and anxiety every day. More than 100 million Americans either live near the brink of poverty or churn in and out of it, and nearly 70 percent of them are women and children.
Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson envisioned the Great Society and called for a War on Poverty, naming my father, Sargent Shriver, the architect of that endeavor. The program worked: Over the next decade, the poverty rate fell by 43 percent.
In those days, the phrase “poverty in America” came with images of poor children in Appalachian shacks and inner-city alleys. Fifty years later, the lines separating the middle class from the working poor and the working poor from those in absolute poverty have blurred. The new iconic image of the economically insecure American is a working mother dashing around getting ready in the morning, brushing her kid’s hair with one hand and doling out medication to her own aging mother with the other.
For the millions of American women who live this way, the dream of “having it all” has morphed into “just hanging on.” Everywhere they look, every magazine cover and talk show and website tells them women are supposed to be feeling more “empowered” than ever, but they don’t feel empowered. They feel exhausted.
Many of these women feel they are just a single incident—one broken bone, one broken-down car, one missed paycheck—away from the brink. And they’re not crazy to feel that way:
Women are nearly two-thirds of minimum-wage workers in the country.
More than 70 percent of low-wage workers get no paid sick days at all.
40 percent of all households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income.
The median earnings of full-time female workers are still just 77 percent of the median earnings of their male counterparts.
This is the first post-recession recovery since 1970 in which women have continued to lose jobs while men have gained more than 1.1 million jobs.”
Powerful and Powerless by Maria Shriver 
The 400-page, comprehensive Shriver Report, which includes essays from Hillary Rodham Clinton, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, Anne-Marie Slaughter and Sheryl Sandberg, is available for a free download until January 15th. 
Jan 13, 2014 / 241 notes

And here is a good dose of reality.

kateoplis:

Let me state the obvious: I have never lived on the brink. I’ve never been in foreclosure, never applied for food stamps, never had to choose between feeding my children or paying the rent, and never feared I’d lose my paycheck when I had to take time off to care for a sick child or parent. I’m not thrown into crisis mode if I have to pay a parking ticket, or if the rent goes up. If my car breaks down, my life doesn’t descend into chaos.

But the fact is, one in three people in the U.S. do live with this kind of stress, struggle, and anxiety every day. More than 100 million Americans either live near the brink of poverty or churn in and out of it, and nearly 70 percent of them are women and children.

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson envisioned the Great Society and called for a War on Poverty, naming my father, Sargent Shriver, the architect of that endeavor. The program worked: Over the next decade, the poverty rate fell by 43 percent.

In those days, the phrase “poverty in America” came with images of poor children in Appalachian shacks and inner-city alleys. Fifty years later, the lines separating the middle class from the working poor and the working poor from those in absolute poverty have blurred. The new iconic image of the economically insecure American is a working mother dashing around getting ready in the morning, brushing her kid’s hair with one hand and doling out medication to her own aging mother with the other.

For the millions of American women who live this way, the dream of “having it all” has morphed into “just hanging on.” Everywhere they look, every magazine cover and talk show and website tells them women are supposed to be feeling more “empowered” than ever, but they don’t feel empowered. They feel exhausted.

Many of these women feel they are just a single incident—one broken bone, one broken-down car, one missed paycheck—away from the brink. And they’re not crazy to feel that way:

  • Women are nearly two-thirds of minimum-wage workers in the country.
  • More than 70 percent of low-wage workers get no paid sick days at all.
  • 40 percent of all households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income.
  • The median earnings of full-time female workers are still just 77 percent of the median earnings of their male counterparts.

This is the first post-recession recovery since 1970 in which women have continued to lose jobs while men have gained more than 1.1 million jobs.

Powerful and Powerless by Maria Shriver 

The 400-page, comprehensive Shriver Report, which includes essays from Hillary Rodham Clinton, Senator Kirsten GillibrandBeyoncé Knowles-Carter, Anne-Marie Slaughter and Sheryl Sandberg, is available for a free download until January 15th. 

kateoplis:

The best.

One of our favorite moments from the red carpet last night. And now that’s it. Done with the Golden Globes. Bring on the Oscars!
Jan 13, 2014 / 958 notes

kateoplis:

The best.

One of our favorite moments from the red carpet last night. And now that’s it. Done with the Golden Globes. Bring on the Oscars!

Jan 13, 2014 / 354 notes

Diane Keaton Accepts Woody Allen’s Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 71st Annual Golden Globes.

Some mocked Keaton for this — we loved it!

newyorker:

Michael Schulman on the Golden Globes, Hollywood’s drunk wedding: http://nyr.kr/1fs7wy0

“There is the movie clan—old money, better clothes—that arrives with its paterfamilias (played last night by Robert Redford), its wacky aunt (Emma Thompson), its cool little sister who just graduated (Jennifer Lawrence), and its ne’er-do-well cousin (Matthew McConaughey, or, if you please, Robert Downey, Jr.). Then there are the TV people—déclassé, maybe, but looser—with their overdressed great-uncle (Jon Voight, in a white scarf), their grizzled father of the bride (Bryan Cranston), their fratty best man (Andy Samberg), and the mic-hogging second cousin no one quite remembers inviting (Jacqueline Bisset).”

Photograph by Paul Drinkwater/NBC.
Jan 13, 2014 / 313 notes

newyorker:

Michael Schulman on the Golden Globes, Hollywood’s drunk wedding: http://nyr.kr/1fs7wy0

“There is the movie clan—old money, better clothes—that arrives with its paterfamilias (played last night by Robert Redford), its wacky aunt (Emma Thompson), its cool little sister who just graduated (Jennifer Lawrence), and its ne’er-do-well cousin (Matthew McConaughey, or, if you please, Robert Downey, Jr.). Then there are the TV people—déclassé, maybe, but looser—with their overdressed great-uncle (Jon Voight, in a white scarf), their grizzled father of the bride (Bryan Cranston), their fratty best man (Andy Samberg), and the mic-hogging second cousin no one quite remembers inviting (Jacqueline Bisset).”

Photograph by Paul Drinkwater/NBC.

food52:

Go ahead. Have toast for dinner.
Read more: Mushrooms on Toast on Food52.

YUM. 
Jan 13, 2014 / 99 notes

food52:

Go ahead. Have toast for dinner.

Read more: Mushrooms on Toast on Food52.

YUM. 

blairsalvatore:

71st Annual Golden Globe Awards

Looking incredible at 43
Jan 13, 2014 / 28 notes

blairsalvatore:

71st Annual Golden Globe Awards

Looking incredible at 43

katharinecliftons:

Helen Mirren attends the 71st Golden Globe Awards 2014

Yes we are fans
Jan 13, 2014 / 223 notes

katharinecliftons:

Helen Mirren attends the 71st Golden Globe Awards 2014

Yes we are fans

(via kristinscottthomas)